NDIS

The National Insurance Disability Scheme (NDIS) supports people with disabilities to build skills and capability so they can participate in the community and employment. This is a new way of funding disability services supporting people with their families and carers. It aims to give people with disabilities real choice and control over the assistance they receive and how they live their lives.

What is the NDIS?

The NDIS is a new scheme introduced by the Commonwealth Government to ensure all Australians under 65 years of age with disability receive the right level of funding so that individualised support services and resources can be delivered to the person as necessary. The NDIS is managed through the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA).

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The NDIS can also assist families and carers with information about services to support people with disability.

The NDIS is not means tested and will not impact on your income, Disability Support Pension and/or Carers Allowance.

You can find out more from the NDIS Website

The NDIS will commence in Albany and the Great Southern Region on the 1st July 2019.

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How does NDIS planning work?

Once a planning meeting with an NDIS Local Coordinator has been arranged, it is important to have someone with you who can help you understand the information and what can be included in your plan. This can be a family member, a friend or someone from CLA.

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The NDIS funds supports that are deemed reasonable and necessary. This means for a support to be funded it must be linked to an outcome you have identified in your plan.

Here are some questions you may wish to consider before attending your planning meeting.

  • What does your life look like now?
  • What is working for you at home?
  • What supports are you receiving?
  • What additional support do you need to assist you at home and in the community?
  • What is your accommodation like?
  • What things do you enjoy?
  • What activities would you like to try?
  • What are your interests or hobbies?
  • Are you working or studying?

Once your NDIS plan is approved it will usually be reviewed every 12 months (some plans may be reviewed more often) if your circumstances or needs change you can request for your plan to be reviewed at any time.

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How do I access the NDIS?

If you are already receiving disability support services, you or your family member will be contacted by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) when the NDIS becomes available in your area. The NDIA will ask you to verify your personal details, age and residency status for NDIS eligibility purposes.

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If you are uneasy about providing this information and would like some assistance, contact your CLA Coordinator who will be happy to assist you with the NDIA contact.

Your existing support arrangements will continue until you start your NDIS plan.

If you are not currently receiving any disability support services, but may wish to join the NDIS scheme when it becomes available in your area, you will need to contact the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to request an Access Request Form.

For further details on the NDIS eligibility requirements, visit https://ndis.gov.au/people-disability/access-requirements.html

To find out more about the NDIS or how CLA can assist you, contact us on 9842 3855 or email admin@myCLA.org.au

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What are nominees and guardians under the NDIS?

Nominees will be appointed where requested by the participant or where necessary. If a guardianship arrangement is in place the presumption is that the guardian will be appointed the nominee.

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National Standards for Disability Services

Photo of Cover of National Standard for Disability Services

Cover of National Standards for Disability Services

In 2013, Disability Reform ministers from all jurisdictions endorsed the revised National Standards for Disability Services. 

These new standards are seen as a transitional reform enabling nationally consistent quality standards to apply for the disability services sector.  They have a greater focus on person centred approaches and promote choice and control by people with disability. These are considered critical under the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Download the National Standards for Disability Services (Easy Read) Version

Photo of How to Use Easy Read Versions

How to Use Easy Read Versions

 

Self Managing Your NDIS Plan

httpv://youtu.be/baU45jGnWS4

Accessing the NDIS

httpv://youtu.be/EM03PSz3Ar8

My NDIS Pathway

httpv://youtu.be/JF-lWW2i5Zk

Developing your first NDIS plan

httpv://youtu.be/YALPHRYaNps

Reasonable and necessary supports

httpv://youtu.be/TAMD1S-gorM
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Sign up to the NDIS newsletter

Sign up for NDIS newsletter

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NDIS Participant portal user guide

The NDIS participant portal is called myplace. It is a secure website for participants or their nominee to view their NDIS plan, request payments and manage services with providers.
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School Leaver Employment Supports

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvEYbbYRfeM
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NDIS Access checklist

The NDIS Access checklist will help you work out if you can access the NDIS. section of the website.
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WA NDIS Facebook Page

WADS - Who can apply for the NDIS
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Who can apply for the NDIS
WADS - What will NDIS cover and not cover
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: What will NDIS cover and not cover
WADS - What is the NDIS and NDIA
Western Australian Deaf Society - What is the NDIS and NDIA
WADS - What is reasonable and necessary
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: What is reasonable and necessary
WADS - Using your plan
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Using your plan
WADS - Roll Out of National NDIS in WA
Western Australian Deaf Society - Roll out of National NDIS in WA
WADS - Thinking about your plan and planning for your child
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Thinking about your plan and planning for your child
WADS - Preparing for your plan
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Preparing for your plan
WADS - Next steps, planning and WADS contact information
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Next steps, planning and WADS contact information
WADS - New NDIS clients, transfers and while I wait for NDIS
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: New NDIS clients, transfers and while I wait for NDIS
WADS - How to apply for NDIS and what you need to provide
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: How to apply for NDIS and what you need to provide
WADS - Creating your plan with your planner
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Creating your plan with your planner
WADS - Attending your planning meeting
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: attending your planning meeting
WA NDIS - mental health supports
Veronica Ninham is the mother of Ben White who receives supports under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Veronica Ninham, Ben White’s mother
Transcript:
Introductory text: The NDIS allows you to plan for a good life through identifying supports that meet your current and future needs and goals.
Veronica Ninham: For Ben, I think, the most important benefit has been the change in his own self-esteem and his sense of confidence and being able to plan for the future instead of, as I said, just sitting around, not doing anything with his life. That’s made a real difference. He does still have schizophrenia, he’s still got obsessive-compulsive disorder and he’s still got brain damage. But he’s integrated into the community better because he’s got the confidence now to feel that he can mix with people and he’s doing volunteer work where he says, “It’s wonderful, instead of me always being the one asking for help to be able to give some help.”
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS - Local Coordination support
Lorraine Frost-Barnes is the mother of Luther Frost-Barnes who has developed a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) plan with support from his Local Coordinator Leanne Sutton.
Transcript
Introduction text: Everybody who is eligible for the WA NDIS will have access to a Local Coordinator. Local Coordinators provide personalised, flexible and responsive support to help you plan for your current and future needs.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: Leanne (Local Coordinator) was there big time for us, lots of support. The complicated issues became easier, she would just defuddle them. She would kind of come in and just say ‘look don’t worry so much’ and it would be made easier.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS - supporting independence
Lynne Junor is the mother of Mark Junor who is married to Melissa. Both Mark and Melissa receive supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Transcript
Introduction text: The NDIS allows you to plan for a good life through identifying supports that meet your current and future needs and goals.
Lynne Junor: Our aim was to get Mark and Melissa to be as independent of us as we possibly could, because we’re not getting any younger of course. And we just feel that life is about having choices, they have a right to have choices and to get as much out of life as possible for them.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800
WA NDIS - supporting ageing carers
Lynne Junor is the mother of Mark Junor who receives supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Transcript
Introduction text: The NDIS allows you to plan for a good life through identifying supports that meet your current and future needs and goals.
Lynne Junor: You know it takes a whole heap of ‘what if’ off your mind as parents, you know. I know I talk to other parents who have children with disabilities and it’s this constant thing that hangs over us all the time, ‘what happens when we are not around, what happens if something happens’. Now I am comfortable, like I’m not sort of over concerned about these things because they will be OK. Because everything is in place, that life will continue for them in the way that they understand, they know and are happy with.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS Local Coordinator: Jamie Ashton
Everybody who is eligible for the WA NDIS will have access to a Local Coordinator. Local Coordinators provide personalised, flexible and responsive support to help you plan for your current and future needs.
Transcript
Jamie Ashton (Local Coordinator): I think it is very important when you are working with people that you have got some knowledge of the local area and have got some connection. I am actually a fourth generation Margaret River kid so yes, I am lucky I also have those connections. It is really important to have friends, to have family and to have people that are going to look out for you as you get older.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS personal story: Ben White
Ben White receives supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Ben White
Veronica Ninham, Ben’s mother
Gordon Haynes, Ben’s Support Worker
John Thomson, NDIS Regional Manager
Transcript:
Ben: When I was about 11 years old, I started painting from home using oil paint. And then I went to university – Curtin University – and spent four years there doing graphic design and illustration. And then I found acrylic about six years ago. I’ve been using that ever since. It’s a really good medium to use.
Ben (talking about his paintings): Here’s a self-portrait I did, just as I was starting to get ill.
Veronica (talking to Ben about his paintings): This one really started to show that you were troubled, didn’t it?
Veronica: I wasn’t here all the time and I would come back about every three months to total chaos. His health was not at all good. He had no idea really of how to organise himself and keep his day-to-day things going without assistance. Ben had also put on a lot of weight. He was stagnating. He really wasn’t advancing in any way. And it really seemed that we needed more help to get his life organised and to help him to do some other things.
Gordon: If you’re staying at home, not only are you not exercising your body, you’re just not meeting enough people in your life to make it a rich life.
Ben (talking about surfing): It’s a rush, an adrenaline rush, flying along the face of a wave, trying to beat the white water. It’s fun.
Gordon: I’ve been helping Ben half a day a week with basically fitness really – getting him back into passions that he used to have in regard to being in the ocean and being in nature.
Veronica: So, we met with the local area coordinator…It sounded like an excellent thing for Ben. And she then brought in people and started to get it moving.
John: So, very early on staff from the lower South West engaged with Department of Health, Partners in Recovery, mental health sector organisations to explain that eligibility for psychosocial disability was coming. And since then we’ve had a number of referrals come from those organisations.
Ben: It’s been really good because I get support for things which I can’t do on my own. I joined the gym about four years ago and I wouldn’t go by myself. I didn’t have the motivation. But now I have a friend that’s helping me go to the gym three days a week.
Veronica: He’s lost about, at least 15 kilos I think now. And he’s generally very fit and healthy and looking after himself and taking a pride in himself which he had stopped doing.
John: Of special note really is Ben’s re-engagement with a significant passion of his, which is art and photography.
Veronica: He had an exhibition at the library last July and he got up and spoke at the opening, which was amazing. And he sold all but two of his paintings there.
Gordon: People get very secure in their lives, even if it’s not a particularly stimulating life. So he’s gone outside his comfort regions – jumped on a bicycle when he hasn’t felt like he’s had the balance, jumped on a body board when he hasn’t done it for a lot of time, walked a bit further, swum a bit further in the pool and hopefully he’ll get to the stage where, for example, when he goes to TAFE for photography, he will be the one jumping on a bicycle by himself. So self-motivation is something where we’re trying to head as well.
Veronica: For Ben, I think, the most important benefit has been the change in his own self-esteem and his sense of confidence and being able to plan for the future instead of, as I said, just sitting around, not doing anything with his life. That’s made a real difference. He does still have schizophrenia, he’s still got obsessive-compulsive disorder and he’s still got brain damage. But he’s integrated into the community better because he’s got the confidence now to feel that he can mix with people and he’s doing volunteer work where he says, “It’s wonderful, instead of me always being the one asking for help to be able to give some help.” It’s really worked miracles for Ben. It’s just fantastic to see him blossom into the person that he used to be – very generous and loving and humorous and enjoying people, enjoying what he’s doing, having goals and motivation and being fit and energetic. It’s just a complete transformation.
End writing: Ben continues working hard to improve his painting, photography skills and fitness while planning for his future.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS personal story: Mr and Mrs Junor
Mark and Melissa Junor both receive supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Mark Junor
Melissa Junor
Lynne Junor, Mark’s mother
Valerie Mansfield, Local Coordinator
Transcript:
Melissa Junor: Yes, we were dancing together.
Mark Junor: Yes, first we went dancing then I met Mel in 1996. It was right after ….
Melissa Junor: It was right after you played hide and seek with me.
Mark Junor: Yeah I do. I tickled her and that kind of stuff. And we said we were going to get married.
Mark Junor: Mel chose the ring for me and I gave her one as well.
Lynne Junor: Mark came to me and said he would really like to marry Melissa. I said if you want to do that, you’ve got to do the right thing, save up and buy her an engagement ring. And he did.
You chose your rings didn’t you? (to Melissa)
Mark Junor: My mum made the dress for her on our wedding day and I wasn’t allowed to see it, but I did see it. (Lots of laughing in the background)
Lynne Junor: Our aim was to get Mark and Melissa to be as independent of us as we possibly could, because we’re not getting any younger of course. And we just feel that life is about having choices, they have a right to have choices and to get as much out of life as possible for them.
Valerie Mansfield: Working with Mel and Mark has been fantastic and their parents, Lynn and Gordon…. And it has been a story about trying to find out what the married couples dream was but also finding ways to make that happen for them.
Mark Junor: We watch Home and Away a lot, Star Wars and a few other things like that. Doctor Who is really good and I watch it and every time I like. Mel won’t let me watch it.
Melissa Junor: Only sometimes….(Laughter)
Valerie Mansfield: Melissa has a plan and Mark has a plan but they don’t have a plan between them. It is still individualised to meet their needs. We decided early on that was important.
Lynne Junor: It looks after the individual instead of creating an overall thing that most people would be able to meet some but not all of the things. It is centred around them particularly so they have their own particular plan for their situation and their capabilities. And each of the people that are on it have a plan that is geared to them.
Lynne Junor: One of the worst things when you have a child with a disability is you always wonder what’s going to happen down the track and you know there are some things we don’t have control over. So we have to put things in place to manage the ‘what might be’ in the best way that we can and the plan has worked extremely well for that.
Valerie Mansfield: It’s fun working with Mark and Mel. It’s fun because you see the tremendous achievements that they’ve made over the years and they’ve just got stronger. Mark and Melissa know best about what they want and what they want to do, even if you might think … hmmmmm…. they are pretty much right all the time.
Lynne Junor: You know it takes a whole heap of ‘what if’ off your mind as parents, you know. I know I talk to other parents who have children with disabilities and it’s this constant thing that hangs over us all the time, ‘what happens when we are not around, what happens if something happens ‘. Now I am comfortable, like I’m not sort of over concerned about these things because they will be OK. Because everything is in place, that life will continue for them in the way that they understand, they know and are happy with.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS personal story: Teneal Duggan
Teneal Duggan receives supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Trina Duggan, Teneal’s mother
Teneal Duggan
Valerie Mansfield, Local Coordinator, Margaret River
Jamie Ashton, Local Coordinator, Busselton
Erin Statz, Community Development Officer, Shire of Augusta-Margaret River
Transcript:
Trina Duggan: Teneal is thirty-one years old. We have lived in Cowaramup for her whole life and Teneal enjoys going down into the community and participating in different activities.
Valerie Mansfield: Teneal is gorgeous, she enjoys the company of people, loves her family and doing family things. She works at the Flight Centre, at the Shire and at the school.
Trina Duggan: I think she finds the socialisation part of it really, really good. Some of the more are specific goals that we had planned for Teneal have been her health and fitness. The other one is community access and her social interactions with people. Then the third one is independent living and her finally leaving the nest and moving into her own house and accommodation.
Jamie Ashton: Teneal’s main strength would be in her constitution. Teneal is really quite a confident young woman considering she doesn’t have a huge vocabulary. She is not a big talker but Teneal is actually very stoic and confident and prepared to give anything a go. Teneal’s work has been going really well. She’s prepared to always give it a hundred percent and the people that support Teneal to go to work always enjoy Teneal’s enthusiasm.
Trina Duggan: She’s been at Gath Sport. She started that job whilst she was still in high school during her transition period and we were asked by our Local Area Coordinator at the time what we envisaged for Teneal as she left school. We thought it was important that she have some important roles where she actually feels like she is achieving something.
Teneal Duggan: You are very slack there.
Teneal’s colleague: I am aren’t I? (Laughing)
Teneal Duggan: Go back to work. (Laughing to her colleague)
Teneal’s colleague: Teneal is always telling me “go back to work, stop slacking off”, telling me about her naughty dogs. Yes, she’s a classic girl. When she first came in she barely even spoke and now she’s my boss, always telling me what to do, always in trouble. (Laughing in background)
Trina Duggan: Teneal’s been at the Shire probably about 12 years now. There is always something for her to do down there. It is just a good community where she can go and feel an important part of actually belonging.
Jamie Ashton: I think it is very important when you are working with people that you have got some knowledge of the local area and have got some connection. I am actually a fourth generation Margaret River kid so yes, I am lucky I also have those connections. It is really important to have friends, to have family and to have people that are going to look out for you as you get older.
Erin Statz: Teneal has been working at the council for over ten years. She has been in community development the entire time and she does a whole range of roles really. So she supports not only community development but also the finance and ranger services area. She does all sorts of administrative jobs for us. She is one of the few employees that we have that have disability but have been with the Shire for a very long time. So Teneal has already had her long service leave.
Trina Duggan: She gets not only just the social benefit of being with people but it is also that fulfilment that she is actually completing a task.
Jamie Ashton: Teneal goes to lots of events. Teneal goes to work, Teneal is seen in the community as part of the community and she is very much a welcome part of the community.
Valerie Mansfield: This process has become more about the planning, more about the flexibility and choice for Teneal and her family. And an opportunity for Trina to be able to share with other people, the way that she uses her skills and that funding to give Teneal a good life.
Trina Duggan: It gives people a choice as to whether they wish to self-manage, go through an agency or share their funding arrangements and also gives them a choice as to how they set out their plan.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS personal story: Luther Frost-Barnes
Luther Frost-Barnes receives supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Luther Frost-Barnes
Lorraine Frost-Barnes, Luther’s mother
Leanne Sutton, Local Coordinator, Busselton
John Thomson, NDIS Regional Manager
Transcript:
(Luther flexing his arm muscles)
Lorraine Frost -Barnes: We pumped them up this morning.
Luther Frost-Barnes: No we did not.
Leanne Sutton: Luther’s a twenty-one year old young, multi-faceted man who is living in his own home up in Busselton, who’s got huge amount of aspirations and dreams and he’s slowly working towards making them all real for him. Luther draws people to him, he’s just got a really good ‘can do’ approach to life and with that approach he changes people’s lives because he opens them up to the possibility of what can be done.
Luther Frost-Barnes: I love quad biking because of the speed, rock climbing and going to the gym.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: Two years ago it seemed like a very distant, complex plan that might happen, or it might not, but it actually did happen. We worked quite hard thinking about Luther’s goals. It took a long time, it was a lot of leg work and it was a lot of support from Disability Services Commission. But I felt there had come a time when Luther actually needed to feel that he was able to do all these things for himself and be out there. Through that, becoming independent, I think then he flourished. It’s like the more he is given, the more opportunities, the more he’s wanting it and going for it and achieving it.
Leanne Sutton: Luther has heaps of different strengths, many strengths, but the one that people really are drawn to him with, is his sense of he can achieve anything and give everything a go.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: Leanne was there big time for us, lots of support. The complicated issues became easier, she would just defuddle them. She would kind of come in and just say ‘look don’t worry so much’ and it would be made easier.
Luther Frost-Barnes: I sometimes get some help, pulled up the wall. (Referring to rock climbing)
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: So you are not very good then?
Luther Frost-Barnes: I am. I am good.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: Nah … It’s a transitional period for us. From, sort of, teenage to a fully-fledged adult. Luther is now really pushing what he wants to do and I follow behind.
Leanne Sutton: One of the best changes is that I’ve seen him just start to understand what it takes to live on your own. You know, he’s got to cook, clean and wash and do all those things…He accesses support workers to help him get into the community to go to Toastmasters, to go to the gym and to swimming.
Luther Frost-Barnes: Toastmasters is doing public speaking. You have to look at everyone in the room. I would like to do public speaking, health, mentoring, combining all my skills.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: That was very good. (Luther showing his muscles)
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: He likes kissing them (referring to Luther’s muscles), he’s so terrible.
Luther Frost-Barnes: I don’t.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: You do, you used too.
Leanne Sutton: If you really want to know about Luther, you’ve just got to meet him. If you listen, Luther tells his story better than anyone. You can’t help but understand what an amazing person he is if you just listen.
John Thomson: One of Luther’s key goals is to practise his public speaking and become more confident around that. I know he’s been practising really hard and we really would really like to give him the opportunity to do that.
Luther Frost-Barnes: My motto is never give up.
Ends.
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
The Lighthouse Project - City of Melvile
A City of Melville customer service team officer provides a warm welcome.
The Lighthouse Project - Shire of Denmark
Shire of Denmark staff prove disability is no barrier to getting the job done.
The Lighthouse Project - City of Greater Geraldton
A City of Greater Geraldton staff member books a solid reputation.
Wayne-Carey a delight for his family of eight
Wayne-Carey brings joy, love and laughter to the Farmer family every day, says his mother Kathleen.
Art and music inspire Audrey’s zest for life
Audrey Warbie has a smile that would light up a room. While the 53-year-old has an intellectual disability and uses few spoken words, her body language and facial expressions clearly show her joy for life and people.
Life’s cycle is busy for Aaron
Cycling, a supermarket job and voluntary work combine to make life busy, fulfilling and active for Mandurah man Aaron Hillbrick.

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NDIS Facebook Page

Jack's Fantastic Outcomes with NDIS Self-management
Hi, my name is Jack Kruger. I’m 16. I do soccer reffing. My job is at Harris Scarfe, and then work hard.
Jack is a vivacious young man. He’s very energetic and always having a go at things. When we entered the NDIS I had done quite a bit of research and immediately self-managed fit into what we were hoping to achieve because it gave us the most flexibility.
We’ve employed a mentor around finding work. We’ve also employed a sports coach.
We’ve just loved the flexibility, the building of the relationships and really being able to achieve some fantastic outcomes for Jack.
Jack's NDIS Self-management Story
Hi, my name is Jack Kruger. I’m 16. I do soccer reffing. My job is at Harris Scarfe, and then work hard.
Jack is a vivacious young man. He’s very energetic and always having a go at things. When we entered the NDIS I had done quite a bit of research and I understood there was three options in managing the funding. So, it could be Agency-managed, plan-managed or self-managed. And immediately self-managed fit into what we were hoping to achieve because it gave us the most flexibility.
We chose to directly employ people. We wanted to make sure they were the right people and really aligned with his goals.
We’ve employed a mentor around finding work. We’ve also employed a sports coach. So, a lot riding to the gym. It was for a purpose, because he really wants that independence.
Yeah, I like soccer. I play soccer. Yeah, I learn soccer skills from Alfonso. Yeah, I ride my bike. Me without Mum and Dad. Me, myself.
A quick process around self-management, first we had to tell the planner that we wanted to self-manage. We would have to set up a bank account for Jack. Julia, his mentor would do some hours work. We would claim that after she’s done the work, through the portal, and then that funding would go into Jack’s account and then we could pay Julia.
I think with learning about the portal, it’s not complex. It’s quite simple. If you do net banking, you could self-manage because it really does come down to making that payment.
We’ve just loved the flexibility, the building of the relationships and really being able to achieve some fantastic outcomes for Jack.
The new NDIS website
You told us that you wanted a simpler and easier to use NDIS website.
We've listened, and we’re trialling a new website.
To help you find the information most relevant to you.
Let us know what you think!
With your valued input and feedback, we’ve made some changes.
Let’s take a look around.
ndis.gov.au is now easier to use and to find key information.
Has a postcode finder to search for NDIS offices in your area.
Has a clear structure and layout aligned to your NDIS journey.
And a simpler design to ensure people of all abilities can find the information they need.
The NDIS will continue to create new information for the website and make improvements over the coming 12 months.
If you have any feedback or questions about the website, please email websitefeedback@ndis.gov.au
For more information, visit our website ndis.gov.au or call 1800 800 110
Victoria's Cafe Career
VICTORIA: Hi, everyone. I'm Victoria Elise Marshall I work in the Hub Cafe every Thursday in Anglesea.
I love working at the cafe because it's really important for my career and I really love it.
I'm saving my money in the future.
My favourite jobs in the cafe is serving the food. Hot drinks, hot chocolates and milkshakes, whatever they want.
LEANNE: So my name's Leanne Reynolds and I'm the owner of the Anglesea general store Surfcoast Hub.
We just love having her here. She's a great worker, she is good for everyone's morale, she gets us all laughing.
I would tell any shop owner to hire anyone with a disability, they bring a lot of love, joy and happiness and we all just love having Victoria here.
KAYLA: My name is Kayla and I'm Victoria’s support worker at the Hub Cafe in Anglesea.
I support Victoria in the cafe to achieve her goals and to complete her tasks in a safe and timely manner.
I've absolutely noticed Victoria's skills improve over time. Initially Victoria was very shy announcing what the coffee or food item was to customers and now she walks up to them with confidence and will announce a flat white with soy milk for example.
I do believe Victoria will be able to work at the cafe unsupported. I think we just need to keep building on her confidence to believe in herself that she can do that but she's certainly capable.
VICTORIA: Just loving it, love my career, love being whatever I want to do. Yeah.
Loving it! Just loving it!
For more information visit www.ndis.gov.au or phone 1800 800 110.
Your NDIS Plan
Your NDIS plan is all about you and your individual goals.
It outlines your goals and the supports you will receive from the NDIS, the community and other government supports to help you achieve those goals.
If you need any help understanding or using your plan you will find the my NDIS contact details on the front page of your plan.
There are two sections in the plan that are all about achieving your goals, making it a clearer and more user-friendly format.
1. “How will I achieve this goal” - this will help you with attaining your goals.
And 2. “How will I be supported?” - this will help you understand who will support you with this goal.
The goals in your plan will also be matched up with the different funded supports: Core, Capacity-building and Capital.
Some people might have one funded support and others may have all three.
For your personalised funded supports, there is a total budget making it easier to monitor and use it flexibly where you can.
For more information visit our website www.ndis.gov.au or call 1800 800 110.
How Your NDIS Support Budget Works
How your NDIS support budget works.
Every NDIS participant has different needs.
Your NDIS funding is there to help you meet your short and medium to long-term goals in your NDIS plan.
There are three types of support budgets that may be funded in your NDIS plan:
Core Supports, Capacity Building Supports and Capital Supports.
Your funding is based on what is ‘reasonable and necessary’ to achieve your goals in addition to the support provided by family friends and other community and government services.
Core supports help you with activities related to daily living. For example support with your everyday needs.
Your Core Budget is the most flexible part of your funding. The amount of flexibility will depend on how you've chosen to manage each of the categories in your budget.
You may choose to either self-manage your supports, ask the National Disability Insurance Agency to pay on your behalf, or ask a third-party to manage payments for you (otherwise known as a plan manager).
The budget categories within core supports are:
1. Consumables - for purchasing everyday items such as continence aides, low-risk assistive technology and equipment.
2. Daily Activities - for assistance with self-care such as showering or supermarket shopping
3. Social and Community Participation - such as supports to enable you to engage in social or recreational activities.
If transport is considered reasonable and necessary for you, it can also be included in core supports.
You may have this part of your support budget paid into your nominated bank account on a fortnightly basis.
Capacity Building supports help you to build your longer-term independence and skills.
For example you could undertake development and training to increase your skills in order to find a job or learn to do new things like catch public transport.
Capital Supports include higher cost items like assistive technology and equipment for mobility, communication and recreational inclusion such as wheelchairs or modifications to your car.
It can also be used for home modifications such as the installation of a handrail in a bathroom, or for participants who require it, funding to access Specialist Disability Accommodation.
Funds within the Capital Supports Budget can only be used for the specific purpose in the participant’s plan and cannot be used to pay for anything else.
Where you see ‘quote required’ in your plan, additional information such as quotes or specialist reports will be needed before funding can be made available for a certain item.
You may also have ‘stated supports’ or ‘in-kind’ supports listed in your plans.
Any services listed as ‘stated supports’ are not flexible. This means funding has been allocated for a specific service and you can't use this funding or swap ‘stated supports’ for any other service or support.
If there are supports in your plan that are listed as ‘in-kind’ it means the service has already been paid for by the state, territory or federal government.
This means you cannot choose a provider for that service.
You must use the prepaid provider as they have already received payment and will provide all services that are booked.
Your NDIS supports need to demonstrate they are helping you to achieve your goals listed in your NDIS plan.
Your support budget is there to ensure you achieve outcomes which are directly linked to community and/or workplace participation and living a more independent life.
For more information visit www.ndis.gov.au or phone 1800 800 110.
NDIS Celebrates Diversity for IDPWD - International Day of People with Disability
My disability means that I can show people that diversity can be beautiful and that not everyone’s the same.
I believe that attitude is one of the biggest barriers facing young people with disability in society. People are always surprised when they hear people with disability have jobs or they travel.
When I was diagnosed, people thought that I wouldn’t be able to do simple things like riding a bike, and I’ve definitely proven those people wrong.
My name is Lindy Joy, I’m a world champion in Taekwondo.
My disability means that I may have some different strengths and weaknesses to other people, but I can still do whatever I set my mind to.
I’d like to tell other people with a disability that their disability should never stop them from doing the things that they love and are passionate about.
I like having Down syndrome because I feel strong and confident.
I would like to see attitudes towards disability change in Australia. I think that would give people with disability a lot more opportunity.
I’d like to tell everyone that people should be treated equally, no matter their differences.
And if they could take extra time to listen because I have a lot to say and maybe we will have things in common like a love of cows, planes or Queen music.
I like being different than other people.
I’m so proud of myself.
One way to raise awareness for people with disabilities is via the use of social media. So why not share this video to celebrate diversity?
Belinda's NDIS Supports
Belinda (NDIS participant):
My name is Belinda Mahony, I love doing singing and acting and they’re my goals. I want to be a well-known singer and a well-known actor. And, with my acting and singing, to get work.
Damian (Belinda’s Dad):
Belinda’s been on the NDIS for about two years now, and it’s changed her life because she’s able now to pursue the things that she really loves doing and that she’s good at which is singing and acting, the funding allows her to extend those skills and that makes her happy.
Alma (Belinda’s Support Worker):
Belinda has a variety of funding opportunities within her plan. Core Supports, which is the self-care activities, assist Belinda in her daily living. And this also assists Belinda to access the community.
Belinda has a range of supports covered under the Capacity Building Support budget. That includes improved life choices which is plan manager, improved daily living which is the occupational therapist.
Belinda also has access to health and wellbeing support to assist her with nutritional meal planning and to enhance her psychological and physical wellbeing.
Damian:
It makes us really proud to see Belinda performing and following her dreams. Belinda has really grown through this process and we’re really looking forward to the future in terms of the opportunity it might bring for Belinda.
Belinda:
I’m lucky that I have the NDIS in my life. I don’t think I’ll ever stop singing, I don’t think I’ll ever stop acting, because I love it.
Understanding the NDIS
This video is an introduction to the NDIS.
The National Disability Insurance Scheme (also called the NDIS) is the new way of providing support to Australians with disability, their families and carers.
The NDIS will provide all Australians under the age of 65 who have a permanent and significant disability with the reasonable and necessary supports they need to enjoy an ordinary life.
The NDIS will help people with disability achieve their goals, including independence, community involvement, education, employment and health and wellbeing.
As an insurance scheme, the NDIS takes a lifetime approach, investing in people with disability early to improve their outcomes later in life.
The NDIS also provides people with disability, their families and carers with information and referrals to existing support services in the community.
Why do we need the NDIS?
People with disability have the same right as other Australians to decide their best interests and to have choice and control over their lives.
The NDIS recognises that everyone's needs and goals are different. The NDIS provides people with individualised support and the flexibility to manage their supports to help them achieve their goals and enjoy an ordinary life.
The NDIS replaces a disability system that was unfair and inefficient with a new, national system that is world-leading, equitable and sustainable. This provides certainty and consistency for people with disability, their families and carers.
Australians will now have peace of mind that if their child or loved one is born with, or acquires a significant disability that is likely to be with them for life, they will get the support they need, when they need it.
Reaching Goals with the NDIS
TROY: One of my short-term goals is to go and visit one of my friends in Ballarat, and hopefully by the end of it we’re both still in one piece.
WILL: I am working on my independent skills, learning to plan meals, grocery shopping and cooking.
PRUE: Would you like me to talk about this for you?
NAOMI: Yes.
PRUE: So, Naomi’s goal is to continue to live independently and live healthily as she lives independently. And through the NDIS, she’s able to do that.
TROY: I’m doing exercises on a daily basis with the help of my support worker, Matt. And one of my longer-term or life goals is to get back into my walker and be able to weight bear and walk around by myself.
WILL: My long-term goal is to become a farmer. Cows make me happy and I want to be able to look after them. I would also like to have other animals so my friends and family can come and visit.
PRUE: Got your NDIS package, and you are able to move into the house independently with support.
NAOMI: Yep, I love it.
TROY: It would make me feel overwhelmed to achieve that goal. Be persistent, you can do anything you set your mind to, and remember that slow and steady wins the race.

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NDIS Stories

Jack's Fantastic Outcomes with NDIS Self-management
Hi, my name is Jack Kruger. I’m 16. I do soccer reffing. My job is at Harris Scarfe, and then work hard.
Jack is a vivacious young man. He’s very energetic and always having a go at things. When we entered the NDIS I had done quite a bit of research and immediately self-managed fit into what we were hoping to achieve because it gave us the most flexibility.
We’ve employed a mentor around finding work. We’ve also employed a sports coach.
We’ve just loved the flexibility, the building of the relationships and really being able to achieve some fantastic outcomes for Jack.
NDIS Stories - Roy's quest to walk
I’m Roy Davie. I’m a father of two boys. I’m engaged. I run two home businesses. I’m studying part time. I work part time at the Collingwood
Football Club community centre. And I’m also a C1 incomplete quadriplegic. My injury happened in 2009. I spent four months in hospital. At the time I was told that I would be a quadriplegic and for me that meant, life being completely confined to a wheel chair
and relying on support 24/7. I spent a good sort of three years
really just confined to the house doing nothing, and that
was a pretty dark time. I, yeah, just felt like life
was pretty much over and I couldn’t do the things I loved to do anymore.
What have you got for lunch today? It was 2013 just before the roll out.
Bye.
Have a good day!
Bye Boys!
Bye boys!
I was told that I would be transferring from my DHS package to NDIS. The NDIS has, helped me to be more independent, by supporting me with
modifications to my new house. Helping me get back driving a car. Driving a car has been huge for me. That’s allowed me to be able to go out and do things with just the boys and on my own. Also, they’ve helped, get me back to the gym, which will lead to the ultimate goal of being able to walk a lot more and not have to rely on the chair as much as what I do.
My original plans were around that independence and being able to just have some freedom to do stuff. My current plan now is to have some sort
of intense rehab and physiotherapy to allow me to improve on my walking and my general mobility and my strength. To be able to obviously walk around with the boys and...who knows, I may be able to walk into their classroom!
Life today is completely different. I’m up with two boys in the morning, getting them ready for school. I get myself to the gym and I can go home, make myself my breakfast, have a shower, get dressed, go to work, go to uni and study. You know, be out and about. Ready to go? C’mon let’s go. I live by the motto,
“I am not what happened to me. I am what I choose to become”.
and the NDIS has given me the choice to be able to live independently and achieve those goals that I set in place. It’s given me the chance to choose to be a better father, a better person, and to be more actively involved in the community. To have that choice and that flexibility to be able to do those things has been fantastic.
Max participates in the School to Employment Transition Program (SLES)
Well, every day starts pretty much the same for me. You know, you shut off your alarms. You clean yourself up, get your clothes ready, catch the bus into the city, walk to work. I’ve always got to remember to bring my security clearance to my job, because otherwise I can’t get into the building.
I basically work at the Department of Agriculture right now. I’m a QA for records. Some of the things that make me good at this kind of job are my attention to detail, because I’m very good at finding those little pieces, like two stamps being very similar but one’s angled a little bit more clockwise than the other. That stuff, I can see.
Every day before I got a job, I used to ask myself “Why am I getting up in the morning?”
A job really gives you something else. Because the job, it gives you a bit of a purpose. It’ll pay you. You can see the long term interest. You can start setting goals for yourself and it’ll help provide that motivation to go “That’s why I’m getting up in the morning.”
Prior to having a job, he was very pit-stopped. He was just like “Is this as good as it gets?” And now, seeing what he’s got in the bank has given him a really big boost of confidence. It’s been wonderful.
The best thing about having a job? Getting paid. That is the number one best thing out of a job. There’s a few other things. Firstly, you’re getting out. Going out and getting something accomplished. That’s what the job does. It’s getting me out there, it’s letting me accomplish something, do something with myself.
Through NDIA, through the SLES program, and through the employment agency, it’s given Max more confidence. It’s given him a different perspective.
I didn’t have a plan when I left college. The NDIS – they had a plan. They had the school leaver’s plan. And that thing saved my life. Possibly literally, because with their funding and their support, they really help you out and suddenly it all looks a lot brighter out there.
NDIS Staff Profile - Debbie
Hi, my name is Debbie and I’m a planner here in the Ipswich office.
The planning process is working on someone’s goals and aspirations for what they want to achieve, and also looking at their immediate and unmet needs.
So, I have cerebral palsy and now I can say that I’m not only a planner but also a participant in the scheme. So I’m viewing things from two different sides. I’m actually experiencing what it’s like to have an NDIS plan as well as doing other people’s planning conversations.
So I actually am a lawyer by trade and I had time off work to have my children. And it was kind of during that time that I realised that I actually want to go back into a job that was worthwhile. I wanted my time away from my kids to mean something. But it’s been the best decision that I’ve ever made.
I never thought that it could feel as good as it does to support those people that didn’t really have a voice and needed direction. I actually feel value in my disability. It was meant to happen, I’m meant to be here, and I’m meant to help people get their choice and control and to actually drive their own lives.
NDIS Stories - Adam from Wyongah New South Wales
I’m Adam from Wyongah on the Central Coast of New South Wales. My role at McDonald’s is customer area, clean tables, mop the floors, and sometimes when it gets busy I help them on the fries.
Adam lost his job in August last year when I was away on holidays. Got back here and he was very depressed.
I didn’t know there was stuff out there like NDIS and I just thought you stick to one job. You stay with that job for the rest of your life.
We currently have around 12% of our total employee numbers as disability employees. Adam’s been an employee of ours now for quite some time. He’s amazing, the customers love him, we get a lot of positive feedback and compliments, and Adam’s such an asset to have. So friendly, always here early, always wanting to stay back and give 100%.
What I like best about working at McDonald’s is that the staff are so friendly and sometimes the customers are very nice people to talk to.
NDIS has improved my life so much. I didn’t know there was options out there.
Since Adam’s received his plan, I’ve witnessed a huge transformation from a man who had lost his job and had worked for 25 years and didn’t know what to do with his days, to a man who’s got a job. Being out there in the community. What a man.
You know, Adam’s a lot more happy in himself. It’s back to the old Adam.
My job makes me feel good. I’m out there doing something that I really like. I didn’t like what I was doing in the past but now I really do really like it.
NDIS Stories - Adam from Wyongah New South Wales
I’m Adam from Wyongah on the Central Coast of New South Wales. My role at McDonald’s is customer area, clean tables, mop the floors, and sometimes when it gets busy I help them on the fries.
Adam lost his job in August last year when I was away on holidays. Got back here and he was very depressed.
I didn’t know there was stuff out there like NDIS and I just thought you stick to one job. You stay with that job for the rest of your life.
We currently have around 12% of our total employee numbers as disability employees. Adam’s been an employee of ours now for quite some time. He’s amazing, the customers love him, we get a lot of positive feedback and compliments, and Adam’s such an asset to have. So friendly, always here early, always wanting to stay back and give 100%.
What I like best about working at McDonald’s is that the staff are so friendly and sometimes the customers are very nice people to talk to.
NDIS has improved my life so much. I didn’t know there was options out there.
Since Adam’s received his plan, I’ve witnessed a huge transformation from a man who had lost his job and had worked for 25 years and didn’t know what to do with his days, to a man who’s got a job. Being out there in the community. What a man.
You know, Adam’s a lot more happy in himself. It’s back to the old Adam.
My job makes me feel good. I’m out there doing something that I really like. I didn’t like what I was doing in the past but now I really do really like it.
Jack's NDIS Self-management Story
Hi my name is Jack. I'm 16.
I ride my bike.
I like soccer.
I do soccer reffing.
Yeah, I learnt soccer skills with Alfonzo.
I've learnt skills with Julia.
New skills, to get a job.
My boss' name is Zeb. I help him.
I help people.
I have a lawn-mowing business,
with my cousin.
The future... Be a businessman.
Have my own home.
NDIS Self-Management - Choice
The benefit of self-managing is that we’ve had the choice. We chose to directly employ people.
We’ve just loved the flexibility, the building of the relationships and really being able to achieve some fantastic outcomes for Jack.
Lucille and Doreen's NDIS Story
My name is Doreen Ansey, I was born and bred in Ayr. I come from the Birregubba Nation and I’m from Juru Land.
Lucille, she’s a character. When Lucy was 21, she had a stroke. She was a healthy person, played sports and liked to go shopping in those times and still doing it now.
I hear a lot about the NDIS, and I said, ‘Is it for Lucille? Is it for my people?’
And then Trish, wonderful Trish, she came up and helped me with a plan and we’re acting on it now. Which is wonderful.
NDIS has given Lucille equipment and it’s made her more independent. Lucille will have all that equipment when she finally goes into her unit. That’s her dream. I don’t want my girl leaving this Earth without having fulfilled that dream. And through the NDIS, I know that it’s a possibility. It can happen.
At the Men's Shed - John's NDIS Story
My name’s John. I live in Bundaberg, Queensland. My disability is muscular dystrophy and the type of muscular dystrophy is Mytonic. I was diagnosed when I was 28 but I continued to work until I was 35, and it came to the situation where I just couldn’t do any work at all. So I stopped.
Been sitting at home for two or three years and my friend, I said to him “You know, I don’t know what to do. I’m bored”. So, he said to me “Why don’t you try the Men’s Shed?”
From the time I got there, they made me feel welcome, and it’s one of the best things I’ve done in my life.
John turned up about four years ago, and he was really good. We made him Vice President the first year he came, and he’s been Vice President every year since. And he knows more about the Shed than the rest of us put together, probably because he’s here all the time.
With the NDIS, ‘cos I’ve got transport now, I’m at the Men’s Shed, but on the days I’m not I want to look for something else to do. My goal is to be as healthy as I can for as long as I can, and continue doing as much as I can, for as long as I can.
So, the Men’s Shed is my outlet. Everyone is there to help each other. They don’t look at me as the bloke in the wheelchair with disability. They treat me as anybody else there. And that’s what I do love, yeah.
NDIS Stories - Rebecca and her three boys
Hi, I’m Rebecca. I have three boys. Two of them under the NDIS and we’ve been coming to Kid Sense for four years. So ASD is Autism Spectrum Disorder, and for my children it affects how they interact and view the world.
We come to Kid Sense four times a week, so two sessions for speech and two for OT. What we have seen in those four years is phenomenal.
NDIS have been an enormous help. We could not do this without the NDIS.
The NDIS will mean for children in the future, not having it easier, but it will give them the best chance to start early. Therapy is expensive and the NDIS will offer people access to what otherwise they wouldn’t be able to afford.
NDIS Stories - Finding a place to call home
VONDA: Lindsay had his stroke on the first of May last year. It was pretty devastating. Heard him fall, and went into the bedroom and he couldn’t get back into bed. Not knowing what to do with him, they wanted to put him in a home. And that meant an aged care facility. And we just said “No, we’re taking him out”.
STEWART: I’d been working twelve and a half hour shifts, doing two weeks on and a week off, and I didn’t realise that it was just too much for me. I got sick. I got bipolar disorder. It got a hold of me, and it wouldn’t let go. And I just went bang.
MARY: My name is Mary. I became considerably disabled in 2009, when I was diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis. I was told I’d never walk again, that I’d be a vegetable, that I would eventually die of complications, that there was no hope for me. They underestimated me, I’m a tough old girl.
STEWART: I met a lady, Marlene. We both applied to get into the NDIS and we were both accepted, and that was the best thing we ever did.
DAWN: The goal for Stewart and Marlene was to actually move out of a hostel environment, into their own home in the community, with that little bit of support they may need. We decided our best route was to go knocking on the doors of the local real estate. We negotiated their rent on their behalf. One of the local estate agents came on board very, very quickly and were really keen to assist, and I think within a couple of weeks they came up with the property that Stewart and Marlene are now living in.
VONDA: We got a very good lady at NDIS. Very supportive.
LINDSAY: Well, I got Ronald, through SOLAS. Takes me here and there and helps me with shopping occasionally. We go in and visit all the geek shops. That’s the worst problem with being disabled is you tend to sit there and you think the worst of things, and you don’t think that you can do anything. I didn’t realise just what could be done.
MARY: You know, the best plan is to work out exactly what you want and put that forward. I’ve been zealous about leaving aged care. But really, I just want to…. Sort of be alive again. Now that I have the NDIS, I am moving into independent living, where I will have the help that I need and I will be able to have a future.
NDIS Stories - Sheree from Singleton in the Hunter Valley dealing with post stoke symptoms
I’m Sheree, I’m 48 and I live in Singleton in the Hunter Valley. I had a stroke, a massive stroke, back in 2005. My stroke caused me to have paralysis down the left side, which I still have now.
My daughter was only 19 when she took on the role as carer, when I came home from the rehab hospital. Prior to the NDIS, my personal care was very, very limited down to one day a week. For a shower.
Sheree’s a really great example of what the NDIS funding can do to make the difference in people’s lives. I was able to help Sheree by coming into her home and meeting with her and some of her family members, and explained in detail the NDIS. What it would support, and what it won’t support. Sheree’s goals were mostly around increasing her independence around her daily life, and making her home, particularly her bathroom, more safe for her to be able to use eventually without a personal carer.
The NDIS has made life so much easier for me. The funding has allowed me to have a shower every day. My daughter is a lot happier with the NDIS because I’m a lot more independent, and I’m getting out into the community and enjoying life again.
Joshua and Phillip
PHILLIP: Hey Josh.
JOSHUA: Hey Dad.
PHILLIP: How are you going?
PHILLIP: The "Junction" project, as our families call it, has been going now for about four years. And, last time we spoke, we were at a place called "The Junction" and it was a rental accommodation. It was basically a test, or a trial project to see how the boys got on well together in the house and to look at all the problems that occur in that change.
These three young men amazed the families so much in their skills and ability to learn and grow that in June of last year we decided to take it to a final stage and that was to look to buy a house for Josh and for Michael and Fraser.
And that was successful and we're now sitting in Josh's new house in Hamilton, in Newcastle.
JOSHUA: The photos stay in there. The master bed. And this is my bed.
PHILLIP: NDIS have been really wonderful. The project coordinator, Sam, has understood our situation because I think we're a little bit different to the others, so we've got three young men who divide up the funds in equal proportions.
[Adam talks to Josh and the housemates]
ADAM: Josh really has been a bit of the glue in this household. He's always brought the humour and made everyone laugh, so that immediately disarms people. He’s a very humorous kind of guy to be around.
[Joshua chats and laughs]
PHILLIP: I think the biggest handicap that any of our sons and daughters have, are ourselves.
I find it extremely hard when I'm in the gym with Josh, rather than I drive him home, which I really loved and enjoyed doing, I now have to pull back and I allow a car to take Josh home.
TRAINER: How’s that speed? Good? Looking good mate.
PHILLIP: Because this is his independence. It's not up to me. This is for Josh's life, not my life. And at some stage, I'm not going to be here, so, I know that the skills that Josh is developing now, through me withdrawing, will allow him to have a better life when I'm not here. And, I think from parents, that's all our concern. When we're not here, how's our sons and daughters going to live and survive properly?
Don't ever think that they can't do it, because they can. They only need you to withdraw and allow them to do it.
Alexander's delicious success
ALEXANDER: Hey, my name is Alex. I am 22. I run Alexander’s. I sell cakes on Facebook. I make cakes, I make biscuits and caramel slice.
VICKY: So, Alex started a cooking program. He decided, ‘Oh, I like baking. I like cakes.’ From there we’ve gone from making maybe one or two slices a week, now we probably make three or four cakes a week and he just continues to grow with more lessons and yeah, so he loves it.
KAREN: I’m Karen and I come and help Alex make cakes for his business. I help Alex with anything from baking, to decorating, we do cookies, cupcakes, full cakes. Get anything done that he needs for the week.
VICKY: Having the NDIS has just worked out so well for Alex. It’s just made his life better. Alex has a work experience package, so he has six hours one-to-one. So Karen came in and she’s just fitted in beautifully.
KAREN: Yeah, Alex and I work together really well, we’re a great team. So, when I first started teaching Alex, he was a bit quiet. But the more we decorate together we’ve got a bond, a bit more laughing and joking goes on, he takes the Mickey out of me, so yeah.
VICKY: Through having Alex’s NDIS plan, Alex sits in the driver’s seat and he decides on where his life, how he wants it to go, and who he wants in his life. And he can make business decisions for himself.
KAREN: Alex’s business is booming. We started off with, you know, we’ve got a cake every couple of weeks to now it’s like we’ve got three cakes today plus cupcakes.
VICKY: The goal is that Alex has the best possible life that he can have. It’s worked really well for Alex, the NDIS. He’s just, yeah, just thriving.
Ella's quested for inclusive communities
LEANNE: Do you like me to tell them, or you want to tell them? Oh, okay.
Ella has an intellectual disability and verbal dyspraxia. She has help from occupational therapists, speech therapists and a psychologist that has also been helping us actually with the school to work transition.
KERRY: We are still a trial site in Western Australia. During trial we can look at projects that really capitalise on possibilities with the NDIS.
We’re looking at getting young people the opportunity to get work experience and casual jobs in out-of-school hours while they’re still at school, because we know that will help them get employment after school finishes.
LEANNE: Ella joined the school to work transition, what about eight months ago? And she’d been working at a local café. And at the café, what were you doing?
ELLA: Dishes.
LEANNE: Dishes, and what else? Were you wiping down tables? Yeah. And you were delivering coffees. Really good at that.
KERRY: The sky’s the limit. It’s really looking at what the student’s interests are and what can be developed around them.
LEANNE: Her confidence has definitely increased and I’ve noticed her resilience in dealing with people – huge difference. Huge.
ELLA: Awesome.
LEANNE: It’s awesome, but what’s awesome?
ELLA: People are nice.
LEANNE: What about the food.
ELLA: Don’t get me started on that!
LEANNE: Don’t get you started on that ‘cos you like the taste testing, don’t you?
KERRY: As long as they’re interested and ready to explore it, then we can introduce them to a customised employment approach with skilled employers and providers, and see what they can achieve during school years.
LEANNE: At the end of the day, I hope she can live in the community and be supported, and just enjoy life. Just be happy. That’s what I want for her. I really want for her what she wants for herself.
NDIS Stories - Griffin's sky high
My name is Griffin David Falknau, I’ve just turned 31, and I like to meet people. When I go to training I fill up water bottles for the players and meet the players. Meet and greet.
They want water, then they tap me on the shoulder and say “All right, you go out and give the water out”. Yeah, I go to bed thinking about that every night. Every day.
I’m Tania, and I’m Griffin’s mum. And Griffin has autistic traits. He was diagnosed when he was very young. Griffin is the most tenderest, sweetest loving man. He always was as a child. We never had the need to be reliant on any services prior, and then he became quite ill. Suddenly we were all working, and then we we’re not. And then then we were interviewed when the NDIS started to roll out in Toowoomba. And then we realised he could have a support worker, for four to five hours on a Saturday or a Sunday when the games are scheduled.
I’m getting used to it but I think it’s really, really enjoyable. Before my first game I was nervous, but the challenges I face, I will face.
I did cry, I think, the first time. Because all my friends were there and we were all super proud of him. He’s really a big part of the club. They’ve celebrated him at the awards that we have after every game. He’s included. I’m in the audience now and Griffin’s down there wearing his uniform, the boys pat him on the back. He’s part of another community instead of just our little family.
By doing these things I think it just makes me more into a person and my state of mind and body language is helping me grow in different ways.
I’m hitting a patch where I’m feeling real good and things are going to get higher into the sky.
James just loves being a kid.
Hi, my name is James and welcome to my school.
I’m in year one. I do Mandarin – Chinese. And my favourite class is English.
I’m Leah, James’ mum. James is a really happy boy. He loves sport. He loves running around and being active, playing with his friends.
James had some trouble communicating. He was never frustrated but his dad and I were the only ones who could really understand him. And friends would always look to us to interpret what he was saying and I felt like I became his interpreter everywhere he went.
We were concerned and we were told that it’s okay, just give it some time. And so we gave it time, but by the time he got to three we really thought that maybe he should be able to communicate with people that weren’t his family, so we thought it was time to seek some assistance.
James came to me at three years of age and he had limited words, single words and about 20-25 words. He developed very quickly. He came with a stutter as well and some articulation difficulties, so he needed a good three years to get us through all of those.
We kind of did like, words. And we even did some games. And sometimes at the end I got to play games and stuff.
Early intervention is getting the children in as early as possible to make sure that they’re developing skills required for primary school, high school, adolescence and into adulthood.
I went to Meagan’s in kindy I think. I finished about ten weeks ago and I got a toy dinosaur. A pterodactyl.
So we finished a couple of months ago I think, which was a big milestone for the whole family. Really exciting for him and for us. It was great for him to start school being able to communicate with his friends and the teacher. On the whole he’s picked up to where he should be and it’s just such a joy to see him communicate with his friends and everybody, going to birthday parties and being able to join in with everybody else.
NDIS Stories - John's family home
JOHN: My name’s John Coyle. I live in Tasmania. I have three beautiful children. My two eldest children have intellectual disabilities. Bridget, my eldest daughter, is 22 and she has what they call a chromosomal deletion. Riley, he’s 20. He has autism. They are two different sets of disabilities and they have two completely different sets of needs.
My wife passed away twelve years ago after a six-year battle with breast cancer. And life has not been easy. It’s been a hard road.
When we had all three kids at home, it was 25 hours a day, eight days a week. And I required in-home support. I simply couldn’t do it on my own. I’d have different faces coming in every morning. Someone you didn’t know could rock up to your door, who didn’t know your children.
As a parent I simply didn’t know where my children were going to go, beyond the family home. The greatest development in all of that is the NDIS.
One of the main things is Bridget being offered external residence and full-on support. I’ve got peace of mind in knowing that she’s cared for and she’s comfortable and I’ve watched her grow and settle in. And she’s making a home for herself up there.
BRIDGET: Living here, it makes me happy and cheerful. I’ve been living here for two years. I’m happy because I have friends.
JOHN: They’ve become a little community up there. And watching her become a part of that, is what every parent wants for their child. She’s finding a home for herself beyond me, beyond the family home.
Riley, he gets fed up of being with dad all the time. So every second Saturday and Sunday, he goes out one-on-one, outside the home, so that’s allowed him some individuality. And those days I’m gaining a little bit of life back and that will evolve over time too.
I won’t say I don’t have anxieties – I do. But I’m far more confident about the future than I’ve ever been.
NDIS Stories - Sam becomes a mentor for other participants
My name is Sam. I am 25 years old. My favourite TV show is Home and Away. I point to symbols to communicate. I also use signs and speech.
My name’s Peter and I’m a speech pathologist here at St Giles. Sam, he had some speech but a lot of people couldn’t understand his speech. Once Sam became a participant with the NDIA, we started exploring options and he ended up getting the app, Proloquo2Go. What it can do now is it can allow him to communicate about his interest and things that he likes. But he can also now have a thought about something or express a feeling and he can say that by combining words, so he’s moving towards having any thought and being able to express it. And we are able to provide more support in terms of getting Sam to use it in different situations.
Sam will come in to St Giles and we’ll do some work together with his device, and then Sam and I will do some things around St Giles. We might do some jobs that need doing, don’t we Sam?
Yeah.
And sometimes we’ll leave St Giles and go out and do some work out in the community together.
From his doing really well and being kind of like a mentor, we had the idea that Sam could maybe work with some of our other participants. We thought he would be really helpful in showing people how he uses his app and just being a model for other participants, but also for families to see what’s possible with these kind of systems.
The ultimate goal for Sam is to have paid employment, and he’s expressed an interest in that. We think he’s got the potential to do that with the things that he’s shown us already. We can often help people but the mentors or actual users can provide something different than what we can do.
I feel good about working at St Giles. I like being a participant in the NDIS.
Mary's journey to defy the doctors
My name is Mary. I became considerably disabled in 2009 when I was diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis. I was told I’d never walk again, that I’d be a vegetable, that I’d eventually die of complications, that there was no hope for me. They underestimated me - I’m a tough old girl.
I survived, but when I finally came out of the coma I found myself pretty much abandoned in the hospital, homeless, and really disabled. And eventually my children got a room in a ward here, at an aged care facility. It was really, really a dreadful time for me. I was 58 when I came to the facility. I was told that it would be only for two or three weeks. I’m 63 now.
I’ve been zealous about leaving aged care. But really I just want to be alive again. Now that I have the NDIS I am moving into independent living, where I will have the help that I need and I will be able to have a future. I’m here now and just simply waiting for the word ‘here’s the keys’.
The best plan is to work out exactly what you want and then put that forward. It takes what people like me feel like is forever, but I don’t believe in rushed jobs. The wait is worth it because when you do get your package, you’ve got hope. You’ve got a future. You’ve really got something to look forward to.
NDIS Story - Lindsay from Townsville
Hello I’m Lindsay Jeffrey, I’m from Townsville in Queensland. I’m 55. I was a commercial cleaner all my life until I woke up one morning and found that I couldn’t move.
Lindsay had his stroke on the first of May last year. It was pretty devastating. I heard him fall and went into the bedroom and he couldn’t get back into bed. Not knowing what to do with him they wanted to put him in a home. And that meant, an aged care facility. And we just said no, we’re taking him out. That was the best thing we ever did.
We got a very good lady at NDIS, very supportive. One of the things that they said at NDIS, you’re aged parents. Which we are. We’re still fairly active, really, but for how long? We don’t know. Nobody knows. So we had to put things in place that were going to benefit Lindsay.
Well I got Ronald through SOLAS. Takes me here and there and helps me with shopping occasionally. Go in and visit all the geek shops.
He just took to Ronald like a duck to water. They’re good buddies.
The work I’ve been doing with Lindsay is giving him that mental support. Having a nice chat with him and to bring back those experiences that he missed out on. You know, go down to The Strand. He hasn’t been to the beach in a very long time. Yeah, he took this little remote control car and he just had a ball. It was just an amazing feeling, just amazing feeling.
He’s a completely different person. He’s just so enthused to go out and try and do things for himself.
I’d like to see him be able to be a little bit more independent. Because there are a lot of his age group who have strokes, or even younger. And they’ve still got a life to lead. They’ve got to have some independence.
That’s the worst problem with being disabled is, you tend to sit there and think the worst of things. You don’t think that you can do anything. I didn’t realise just what could be done. Stick with it. You might think nothing’s going to happen, but it does eventually happen. You’ve just got to be prepared to wait.
NDIS Stories - Oni's choice and control with the NDIS
ONI: Hey, my name is Oni and I’m an NDIS participant. When I was born they did some injections and it gave me a stroke and made me deaf. Since I was deaf I couldn’t really learn how to talk so for around about six years of my life I wasn’t able to talk and hear.
And after I was six, I was still not very well developed in English because obviously not being able to hear anything for a lot of your life is very hard.
CHELINAY: I couldn’t see a way forward for him so easily. And I couldn’t think that he would actually be independent. Since NDIS, he’s had lots of speech therapy, and if you’d spoken to him say a year and a half ago, you wouldn’t be able to understand him. I couldn’t understand him.
ONI: I’ve been working with a speech therapist to get my speech up and it’s really helping. I can say a few more words and actually pronounce them properly and all that.
CHELINAY: For him it was very moving when he went to NDIS, and the number of times he’s been, he’s been served by people who have disabilities of various types.
ONI: One of the best things is that they hire disability people. They don’t think that they should just be looked after, they hire them and they help them through their work and all that.
CHELINAY: He’s only been in one year and the changes have been remarkable. I’ve seen his confidence improve out of sight. I’ve heard him be able to speak and say words that we didn’t even know he knew.
ONI: With being deaf a lot of my life, dealing with it by myself isn’t really an option. NDIS has been there for a lot of this year and they’ve really been helping me through with the speech therapist and all other sort of stuff.
CHELINAY: In one year he’s made enormous changes that are unrecognisable. He’ll have funding for this next period to set him up and then that will end this year. And then, as far as he’s concerned, he no longer has a disability but he is being enabled to go on with his life.
ONI: Looking forward to actually learning the experiences of being a teller and actually working in a bank. Every single school week, I’ll be doing one day off where I’m working at the bank. I’ll have that until I’m in year 12. Depending on whether or not they want to hire me, they’ll either put me up to an official teller or an official worker at their bank, or they’ll try to help me find a different job.
CHELINAY: My hope is that his heart shines. Because he’s an incredible young man, he’s a deep thinker and he has a way of coming out of hardship.
NDIS Stories - Kira's Independent thinking takes her to new places
My name is Kira. I am 15 years old. I live in Gumeracha in South Australia and one favourite hobbies is that I like to do art pictures.
I have autism but I see more of it as a difference, and that I think differently and there’s nothing wrong with that.
Kira is accessing the NDIS. We got involved about two years ago. Both Kira and I sat down and set some goals.
One of my goals is be an independent thinker and live life independently. So I wouldn’t have to be just relying on my parents all the time, because I do want to live on my own when I’m older and have my own career and stuff like that.
One of my main supports is my occupational therapist. That’s where I try to achieve my goals to become more independent and get jobs and stuff like that. Then I also have my speech pathologist to learn how to communicate more clearly and keep the conversation going.
Since Kira has accessed the NDIS she has become more social and she has become more of an independent thinker and is now able to make decisions on her own behalf.
The progress that she’s made has made me feel very proud.
You do need to accept yourself for who you are. Don’t see it as that’s who you are, but it’s a part of who you are. So you’re still a human being with value.
NDIS Stories - Devi and Ram's life-changing journey
My name is Devi. I have a son, three years old, Ram, who is enrolled for NDIS.
Ram was born premature, like 25 weeks. And he was in hospital for 103 days. He had a intraocular haemorrhage of grade four on the right side, which makes his left side weak. So, he’s weak with his left hand and left leg.
He needs so much of things like speech, he needed OT, he needed physiotherapy, even he needed many other equipment.
We had an appointment with NDIS in St Marys. It was something new which I don’t know about, NDIS. They are the people who can give you a good support for what Ram actually needs.
We met a planner and she said, don’t worry, there are many other services you can get. She took a list of what we want for Ram to achieve.
For me, as a mother, it is a very vast difference from what I saw him and how he was, because he is achieving all the goals which he has to. But now I can see he’s a totally different boy – using both his hands and legs. He’s walking, he’s speaking. Without NDIS I can’t imagine my life.
From the bottom of my heart to the end of my last breath, I’m thankful to NDIS for my son to be walking, talking and making possible all that he can do in the future.
NDIS Ready: Cynthia from Tasmania
Watch this video to see how the NDIS is supporting Cynthia to achieve her goals.
A complete transcript is available below.
(Music plays)
Between the ages of 19 to 21 to 23 I had a full body stroke, and it was very scary, I thought I was going to die.
I had a blood clot in the brain so I had a stroke, which means brain damage- permanent brain damage.
I had to re-learn to walk and talk and think like a normal woman would, learn how to shower myself, and bathe myself, and take care of myself again.
I have a support worker that comes in and out of the house to watch me do things, as I’m semi-independent. I live in supported accommodation.
I describe my journey as a roller coaster rolled into one.
NDIA has helped me grow into the woman I am today and it’s going to help me keep growing and keep supporting me.
That’s all for now folks, goodbye, Cindy Granger (Laughter).
Rachael's story - NDIS Townsville
My name’s Rachael, I have seven children, but my youngest two daughters both have spina bifida. My youngest, Michelle, has a number of other special needs, so they’ve both been through the NDIS process recently.
As soon as I heard the NDIS coming in, I was really excited and pretty much started straight away. And it’s been fantastic in that now, the focus isn’t just on their disabilities or their challenges, but it’s about how do they become really productive, healthy, happy little members of society.
The NDIS is rolling out in North Queensland, and for people to find out more about it, I definitely suggest they get on our website, which is at www.ndis.gov.au
NDIS profile - what an ordinary life means to Mark
Introductory text:
The NDIS is supporting Australians with disability and their families to live an ordinary life. This is Mark’s story.
Rhonda Galbally, NDIS Independent Advisory Council principal member:
An ordinary life is a life that’s not a fantastic life, not where everything fantastic happens to you. It’s a life that ordinary people would expect to be able to live at different stages of life.
Mark Smith, NDIS participant:
My life before the NDIS revolved around having seizures nearly every day, having brain operations because of the fluid build-up in my head. I wasn’t able to go anywhere, I was pretty much a hermit. There wasn’t any light at the end of the tunnel.
There’s so many different support outlets out there that was untouchable because I didn’t know about them. The NDIS just opened up a floodgate of doors. There was so many people then wanting to help, it was just amazing.
Returning to work, to me, would be the biggest thing because I’m not one of those that would just sit at home and just get along with doing what you’re doing at home.
And I’ve got other grandkids arriving this year. Without the NDIS getting involved, I wouldn’t be able to pick up my new grandbabies like that (Mark mimics holding a baby) because I was too much on a walking frame. It’s just made a big impact on day-to-day living.
Final text:
More video stories on how the NDIS is helping people live an ordinary life will be released soon.

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