WA NDIS Facebook Page

WADS - Who can apply for the NDIS
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Who can apply for the NDIS
WADS - What will NDIS cover and not cover
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: What will NDIS cover and not cover
WADS - What is the NDIS and NDIA
Western Australian Deaf Society - What is the NDIS and NDIA
WADS - What is reasonable and necessary
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: What is reasonable and necessary
WADS - Using your plan
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Using your plan
WADS - Roll Out of National NDIS in WA
Western Australian Deaf Society - Roll out of National NDIS in WA
WADS - Thinking about your plan and planning for your child
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Thinking about your plan and planning for your child
WADS - Preparing for your plan
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Preparing for your plan
WADS - Next steps, planning and WADS contact information
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Next steps, planning and WADS contact information
WADS - New NDIS clients, transfers and while I wait for NDIS
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: New NDIS clients, transfers and while I wait for NDIS
WADS - How to apply for NDIS and what you need to provide
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: How to apply for NDIS and what you need to provide
WADS - Creating your plan with your planner
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: Creating your plan with your planner
WADS - Attending your planning meeting
Western Australian Deaf Society - NDIS in WA: attending your planning meeting
WA NDIS - mental health supports
Veronica Ninham is the mother of Ben White who receives supports under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Veronica Ninham, Ben White’s mother
Transcript:
Introductory text: The NDIS allows you to plan for a good life through identifying supports that meet your current and future needs and goals.
Veronica Ninham: For Ben, I think, the most important benefit has been the change in his own self-esteem and his sense of confidence and being able to plan for the future instead of, as I said, just sitting around, not doing anything with his life. That’s made a real difference. He does still have schizophrenia, he’s still got obsessive-compulsive disorder and he’s still got brain damage. But he’s integrated into the community better because he’s got the confidence now to feel that he can mix with people and he’s doing volunteer work where he says, “It’s wonderful, instead of me always being the one asking for help to be able to give some help.”
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS - Local Coordination support
Lorraine Frost-Barnes is the mother of Luther Frost-Barnes who has developed a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) plan with support from his Local Coordinator Leanne Sutton.
Transcript
Introduction text: Everybody who is eligible for the WA NDIS will have access to a Local Coordinator. Local Coordinators provide personalised, flexible and responsive support to help you plan for your current and future needs.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: Leanne (Local Coordinator) was there big time for us, lots of support. The complicated issues became easier, she would just defuddle them. She would kind of come in and just say ‘look don’t worry so much’ and it would be made easier.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS - supporting independence
Lynne Junor is the mother of Mark Junor who is married to Melissa. Both Mark and Melissa receive supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Transcript
Introduction text: The NDIS allows you to plan for a good life through identifying supports that meet your current and future needs and goals.
Lynne Junor: Our aim was to get Mark and Melissa to be as independent of us as we possibly could, because we’re not getting any younger of course. And we just feel that life is about having choices, they have a right to have choices and to get as much out of life as possible for them.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800
WA NDIS - supporting ageing carers
Lynne Junor is the mother of Mark Junor who receives supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Transcript
Introduction text: The NDIS allows you to plan for a good life through identifying supports that meet your current and future needs and goals.
Lynne Junor: You know it takes a whole heap of ‘what if’ off your mind as parents, you know. I know I talk to other parents who have children with disabilities and it’s this constant thing that hangs over us all the time, ‘what happens when we are not around, what happens if something happens’. Now I am comfortable, like I’m not sort of over concerned about these things because they will be OK. Because everything is in place, that life will continue for them in the way that they understand, they know and are happy with.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS Local Coordinator: Jamie Ashton
Everybody who is eligible for the WA NDIS will have access to a Local Coordinator. Local Coordinators provide personalised, flexible and responsive support to help you plan for your current and future needs.
Transcript
Jamie Ashton (Local Coordinator): I think it is very important when you are working with people that you have got some knowledge of the local area and have got some connection. I am actually a fourth generation Margaret River kid so yes, I am lucky I also have those connections. It is really important to have friends, to have family and to have people that are going to look out for you as you get older.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS personal story: Ben White
Ben White receives supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Ben White
Veronica Ninham, Ben’s mother
Gordon Haynes, Ben’s Support Worker
John Thomson, NDIS Regional Manager
Transcript:
Ben: When I was about 11 years old, I started painting from home using oil paint. And then I went to university – Curtin University – and spent four years there doing graphic design and illustration. And then I found acrylic about six years ago. I’ve been using that ever since. It’s a really good medium to use.
Ben (talking about his paintings): Here’s a self-portrait I did, just as I was starting to get ill.
Veronica (talking to Ben about his paintings): This one really started to show that you were troubled, didn’t it?
Veronica: I wasn’t here all the time and I would come back about every three months to total chaos. His health was not at all good. He had no idea really of how to organise himself and keep his day-to-day things going without assistance. Ben had also put on a lot of weight. He was stagnating. He really wasn’t advancing in any way. And it really seemed that we needed more help to get his life organised and to help him to do some other things.
Gordon: If you’re staying at home, not only are you not exercising your body, you’re just not meeting enough people in your life to make it a rich life.
Ben (talking about surfing): It’s a rush, an adrenaline rush, flying along the face of a wave, trying to beat the white water. It’s fun.
Gordon: I’ve been helping Ben half a day a week with basically fitness really – getting him back into passions that he used to have in regard to being in the ocean and being in nature.
Veronica: So, we met with the local area coordinator…It sounded like an excellent thing for Ben. And she then brought in people and started to get it moving.
John: So, very early on staff from the lower South West engaged with Department of Health, Partners in Recovery, mental health sector organisations to explain that eligibility for psychosocial disability was coming. And since then we’ve had a number of referrals come from those organisations.
Ben: It’s been really good because I get support for things which I can’t do on my own. I joined the gym about four years ago and I wouldn’t go by myself. I didn’t have the motivation. But now I have a friend that’s helping me go to the gym three days a week.
Veronica: He’s lost about, at least 15 kilos I think now. And he’s generally very fit and healthy and looking after himself and taking a pride in himself which he had stopped doing.
John: Of special note really is Ben’s re-engagement with a significant passion of his, which is art and photography.
Veronica: He had an exhibition at the library last July and he got up and spoke at the opening, which was amazing. And he sold all but two of his paintings there.
Gordon: People get very secure in their lives, even if it’s not a particularly stimulating life. So he’s gone outside his comfort regions – jumped on a bicycle when he hasn’t felt like he’s had the balance, jumped on a body board when he hasn’t done it for a lot of time, walked a bit further, swum a bit further in the pool and hopefully he’ll get to the stage where, for example, when he goes to TAFE for photography, he will be the one jumping on a bicycle by himself. So self-motivation is something where we’re trying to head as well.
Veronica: For Ben, I think, the most important benefit has been the change in his own self-esteem and his sense of confidence and being able to plan for the future instead of, as I said, just sitting around, not doing anything with his life. That’s made a real difference. He does still have schizophrenia, he’s still got obsessive-compulsive disorder and he’s still got brain damage. But he’s integrated into the community better because he’s got the confidence now to feel that he can mix with people and he’s doing volunteer work where he says, “It’s wonderful, instead of me always being the one asking for help to be able to give some help.” It’s really worked miracles for Ben. It’s just fantastic to see him blossom into the person that he used to be – very generous and loving and humorous and enjoying people, enjoying what he’s doing, having goals and motivation and being fit and energetic. It’s just a complete transformation.
End writing: Ben continues working hard to improve his painting, photography skills and fitness while planning for his future.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS personal story: Mr and Mrs Junor
Mark and Melissa Junor both receive supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Mark Junor
Melissa Junor
Lynne Junor, Mark’s mother
Valerie Mansfield, Local Coordinator
Transcript:
Melissa Junor: Yes, we were dancing together.
Mark Junor: Yes, first we went dancing then I met Mel in 1996. It was right after ….
Melissa Junor: It was right after you played hide and seek with me.
Mark Junor: Yeah I do. I tickled her and that kind of stuff. And we said we were going to get married.
Mark Junor: Mel chose the ring for me and I gave her one as well.
Lynne Junor: Mark came to me and said he would really like to marry Melissa. I said if you want to do that, you’ve got to do the right thing, save up and buy her an engagement ring. And he did.
You chose your rings didn’t you? (to Melissa)
Mark Junor: My mum made the dress for her on our wedding day and I wasn’t allowed to see it, but I did see it. (Lots of laughing in the background)
Lynne Junor: Our aim was to get Mark and Melissa to be as independent of us as we possibly could, because we’re not getting any younger of course. And we just feel that life is about having choices, they have a right to have choices and to get as much out of life as possible for them.
Valerie Mansfield: Working with Mel and Mark has been fantastic and their parents, Lynn and Gordon…. And it has been a story about trying to find out what the married couples dream was but also finding ways to make that happen for them.
Mark Junor: We watch Home and Away a lot, Star Wars and a few other things like that. Doctor Who is really good and I watch it and every time I like. Mel won’t let me watch it.
Melissa Junor: Only sometimes….(Laughter)
Valerie Mansfield: Melissa has a plan and Mark has a plan but they don’t have a plan between them. It is still individualised to meet their needs. We decided early on that was important.
Lynne Junor: It looks after the individual instead of creating an overall thing that most people would be able to meet some but not all of the things. It is centred around them particularly so they have their own particular plan for their situation and their capabilities. And each of the people that are on it have a plan that is geared to them.
Lynne Junor: One of the worst things when you have a child with a disability is you always wonder what’s going to happen down the track and you know there are some things we don’t have control over. So we have to put things in place to manage the ‘what might be’ in the best way that we can and the plan has worked extremely well for that.
Valerie Mansfield: It’s fun working with Mark and Mel. It’s fun because you see the tremendous achievements that they’ve made over the years and they’ve just got stronger. Mark and Melissa know best about what they want and what they want to do, even if you might think … hmmmmm…. they are pretty much right all the time.
Lynne Junor: You know it takes a whole heap of ‘what if’ off your mind as parents, you know. I know I talk to other parents who have children with disabilities and it’s this constant thing that hangs over us all the time, ‘what happens when we are not around, what happens if something happens ‘. Now I am comfortable, like I’m not sort of over concerned about these things because they will be OK. Because everything is in place, that life will continue for them in the way that they understand, they know and are happy with.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS personal story: Teneal Duggan
Teneal Duggan receives supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Trina Duggan, Teneal’s mother
Teneal Duggan
Valerie Mansfield, Local Coordinator, Margaret River
Jamie Ashton, Local Coordinator, Busselton
Erin Statz, Community Development Officer, Shire of Augusta-Margaret River
Transcript:
Trina Duggan: Teneal is thirty-one years old. We have lived in Cowaramup for her whole life and Teneal enjoys going down into the community and participating in different activities.
Valerie Mansfield: Teneal is gorgeous, she enjoys the company of people, loves her family and doing family things. She works at the Flight Centre, at the Shire and at the school.
Trina Duggan: I think she finds the socialisation part of it really, really good. Some of the more are specific goals that we had planned for Teneal have been her health and fitness. The other one is community access and her social interactions with people. Then the third one is independent living and her finally leaving the nest and moving into her own house and accommodation.
Jamie Ashton: Teneal’s main strength would be in her constitution. Teneal is really quite a confident young woman considering she doesn’t have a huge vocabulary. She is not a big talker but Teneal is actually very stoic and confident and prepared to give anything a go. Teneal’s work has been going really well. She’s prepared to always give it a hundred percent and the people that support Teneal to go to work always enjoy Teneal’s enthusiasm.
Trina Duggan: She’s been at Gath Sport. She started that job whilst she was still in high school during her transition period and we were asked by our Local Area Coordinator at the time what we envisaged for Teneal as she left school. We thought it was important that she have some important roles where she actually feels like she is achieving something.
Teneal Duggan: You are very slack there.
Teneal’s colleague: I am aren’t I? (Laughing)
Teneal Duggan: Go back to work. (Laughing to her colleague)
Teneal’s colleague: Teneal is always telling me “go back to work, stop slacking off”, telling me about her naughty dogs. Yes, she’s a classic girl. When she first came in she barely even spoke and now she’s my boss, always telling me what to do, always in trouble. (Laughing in background)
Trina Duggan: Teneal’s been at the Shire probably about 12 years now. There is always something for her to do down there. It is just a good community where she can go and feel an important part of actually belonging.
Jamie Ashton: I think it is very important when you are working with people that you have got some knowledge of the local area and have got some connection. I am actually a fourth generation Margaret River kid so yes, I am lucky I also have those connections. It is really important to have friends, to have family and to have people that are going to look out for you as you get older.
Erin Statz: Teneal has been working at the council for over ten years. She has been in community development the entire time and she does a whole range of roles really. So she supports not only community development but also the finance and ranger services area. She does all sorts of administrative jobs for us. She is one of the few employees that we have that have disability but have been with the Shire for a very long time. So Teneal has already had her long service leave.
Trina Duggan: She gets not only just the social benefit of being with people but it is also that fulfilment that she is actually completing a task.
Jamie Ashton: Teneal goes to lots of events. Teneal goes to work, Teneal is seen in the community as part of the community and she is very much a welcome part of the community.
Valerie Mansfield: This process has become more about the planning, more about the flexibility and choice for Teneal and her family. And an opportunity for Trina to be able to share with other people, the way that she uses her skills and that funding to give Teneal a good life.
Trina Duggan: It gives people a choice as to whether they wish to self-manage, go through an agency or share their funding arrangements and also gives them a choice as to how they set out their plan.
Ends
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
WA NDIS personal story: Luther Frost-Barnes
Luther Frost-Barnes receives supports and services under the Western Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).
Speakers:
Luther Frost-Barnes
Lorraine Frost-Barnes, Luther’s mother
Leanne Sutton, Local Coordinator, Busselton
John Thomson, NDIS Regional Manager
Transcript:
(Luther flexing his arm muscles)
Lorraine Frost -Barnes: We pumped them up this morning.
Luther Frost-Barnes: No we did not.
Leanne Sutton: Luther’s a twenty-one year old young, multi-faceted man who is living in his own home up in Busselton, who’s got huge amount of aspirations and dreams and he’s slowly working towards making them all real for him. Luther draws people to him, he’s just got a really good ‘can do’ approach to life and with that approach he changes people’s lives because he opens them up to the possibility of what can be done.
Luther Frost-Barnes: I love quad biking because of the speed, rock climbing and going to the gym.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: Two years ago it seemed like a very distant, complex plan that might happen, or it might not, but it actually did happen. We worked quite hard thinking about Luther’s goals. It took a long time, it was a lot of leg work and it was a lot of support from Disability Services Commission. But I felt there had come a time when Luther actually needed to feel that he was able to do all these things for himself and be out there. Through that, becoming independent, I think then he flourished. It’s like the more he is given, the more opportunities, the more he’s wanting it and going for it and achieving it.
Leanne Sutton: Luther has heaps of different strengths, many strengths, but the one that people really are drawn to him with, is his sense of he can achieve anything and give everything a go.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: Leanne was there big time for us, lots of support. The complicated issues became easier, she would just defuddle them. She would kind of come in and just say ‘look don’t worry so much’ and it would be made easier.
Luther Frost-Barnes: I sometimes get some help, pulled up the wall. (Referring to rock climbing)
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: So you are not very good then?
Luther Frost-Barnes: I am. I am good.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: Nah … It’s a transitional period for us. From, sort of, teenage to a fully-fledged adult. Luther is now really pushing what he wants to do and I follow behind.
Leanne Sutton: One of the best changes is that I’ve seen him just start to understand what it takes to live on your own. You know, he’s got to cook, clean and wash and do all those things…He accesses support workers to help him get into the community to go to Toastmasters, to go to the gym and to swimming.
Luther Frost-Barnes: Toastmasters is doing public speaking. You have to look at everyone in the room. I would like to do public speaking, health, mentoring, combining all my skills.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: That was very good. (Luther showing his muscles)
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: He likes kissing them (referring to Luther’s muscles), he’s so terrible.
Luther Frost-Barnes: I don’t.
Lorraine Frost-Barnes: You do, you used too.
Leanne Sutton: If you really want to know about Luther, you’ve just got to meet him. If you listen, Luther tells his story better than anyone. You can’t help but understand what an amazing person he is if you just listen.
John Thomson: One of Luther’s key goals is to practise his public speaking and become more confident around that. I know he’s been practising really hard and we really would really like to give him the opportunity to do that.
Luther Frost-Barnes: My motto is never give up.
Ends.
www.disability.wa.gov.au
1800 996 214
The Lighthouse Project - City of Melvile
A City of Melville customer service team officer provides a warm welcome.
The Lighthouse Project - Shire of Denmark
Shire of Denmark staff prove disability is no barrier to getting the job done.
The Lighthouse Project - City of Greater Geraldton
A City of Greater Geraldton staff member books a solid reputation.
Wayne-Carey a delight for his family of eight
Wayne-Carey brings joy, love and laughter to the Farmer family every day, says his mother Kathleen.
Art and music inspire Audrey’s zest for life
Audrey Warbie has a smile that would light up a room. While the 53-year-old has an intellectual disability and uses few spoken words, her body language and facial expressions clearly show her joy for life and people.
Life’s cycle is busy for Aaron
Cycling, a supermarket job and voluntary work combine to make life busy, fulfilling and active for Mandurah man Aaron Hillbrick.

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